My Blog

By Root River Dental
October 12, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teeth grinding   bruxism  
TakeChargeofStressManagementtoReduceTeethGrindingHabits

It’s hard to avoid stress in the 21st Century. We’re all bombarded with stressors, from work to family — even our smart phones!

The problem really isn’t the stressors themselves but how we respond to them and try to relieve stress. This can often have a negative effect on our health. One example: bruxism, also known as teeth grinding or clenching.

These habits involve the rhythmic or spasmodic clenching, biting or grinding of the teeth, often involuntarily, beyond normal chewing function. It often occurs while we sleep — jaw soreness the next morning is a telltale sign. While there are other causes, stress is one of the most common for adults, bolstered by diet and lifestyle habits like tobacco or drug use, or excessive caffeine and alcohol.

Teeth grinding’s most serious consequence is the potential for dental problems. While teeth normally wear as we age, grinding or clenching habits can accelerate it. Wearing can become so extensive the enamel erodes, possibly leading to fractures or cracks in the tooth.

When dealing with this type of bruxism, we must address the root cause: your relationship to stress. For example, if you use tobacco, consider quitting the habit — not only for your overall health, but to remove it as a stress stimulant. The same goes for cutting back on your consumption of caffeinated or alcoholic drinks.

Adopt an “unwinding” pattern at night before you sleep to better relax: for example, take a warm bath or keep work items or digital media out of the bedroom.  Many people also report relaxation or stress-relief techniques like meditation, mindfulness or biofeedback helpful.

There’s another useful tool for easing the effects of nighttime teeth grinding: an occlusal guard. This custom-fitted appliance worn while you sleep prevents teeth from making solid contact with each other when you clench them. This can greatly reduce the adverse effects on your teeth while you’re working on other stress coping techniques.

Teeth grinding or clenching can prove harmful over time. The sooner you address this issue with your dentist or physician, the less likely you’ll experience these unwanted consequences.

If you would like more information on the causes and treatments for teeth grinding, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Grinding: Causes and Therapies for a Potentially Troubling Behavior.”

By Root River Dental
September 27, 2017
Category: Oral Health
NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”

By Root River Dental
September 12, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   toothpaste  
KnowYourToothpasteHowtoSimplifyYourPurchasingDecision

Confused about which toothpaste to buy? You’re not alone — we’re all regularly confronted with multiple choices when we shop.

But you can simplify your decision-making process by first remembering that toothpaste has one main objective: helping to break down and remove dental plaque when you brush. Plaque is a thin film of bacteria and food particles that if you don’t remove through brushing and flossing could trigger tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease.

Toothpastes contain abrasives and detergents to help make this possible. Abrasives like hydrated silica are gritty substances that work with the mechanical brushing action to loosen plaque. Detergents (usually sodium lauryl sulfate) help loosen and break down particles on your teeth that won’t otherwise dissolve with water alone. The combination of these ingredients and daily brushing action enables you to remove a substantial portion of plaque from your teeth every day.

These ingredients (along with others to retain moisture and bind everything together) are the foundation of any toothpaste. There are other additives, however, that you may also want to consider. The most important is fluoride, a naturally-occurring chemical proven to strengthen enamel against tooth decay. If you’re interested in a brighter smile, you can also look for bleaching agents that may help whiten some enamel staining. And, of course, there are various flavors to suit your taste.

You’ll also want to pay attention to ingredients if you have special concerns. If you have sensitive teeth, your dentist may recommend particular brands that help reduce discomfort. You’ll also want to be on the lookout for ingredients that you may be allergic to like the aforementioned sodium lauryl sulfate or flavors like cinnamon. Be sure to read the ingredients label if you have known issues with certain substances.

And while you’re reading the packaging look for one more thing — the American Dental Association Seal of Approval. This seal means any manufacturer claims for lower occurrences of cavities or other effects by that toothpaste have been independently verified.

It can be overwhelming amid all the product messaging to decide which toothpaste is right for you. But by knowing these basic facts about toothpaste, you can feel more confident choosing the right one to help keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene products, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Toothpaste: What’s in it?

By Root River Dental
September 06, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Tooth Extraction  

Are you dreading a tooth extraction? Don't because most extractions are straightforward and comfortable when your dentist is Dr. Jeffrey tooth extractionWelnak in West Allis, WI. His gentle and highly skilled service will take care of that problematic tooth and put you on your way to full oral health and function. Learn the details on tooth extraction and after care here.

Reasons for tooth extractions

While the team at Root River Dental works hard at preventive dentistry and its many benefits, sometimes a tooth cannot be saved. Reasons for tooth extraction include:

  • Advanced decay or abscess
  • Cracked tooth or root structure
  • Mobility due to injury or advanced gum disease and bone deterioration
  • Impaction below the gum line, especially prevalent with wisdom teeth, or third molars
  • Retention of baby teeth beyond their usefulness (they can impede eruption of adult teeth)
  • Advancement of orthodontic treatment
  • Advancement of cancer treatment when teeth are in the path of head and neck radiation

Whatever the reasons, rest assured your West Allis, WI dentist has carefully examined the tooth and considered all your options before advising tooth extraction.

The actual extraction

A simple extraction usually requires nothing more than a locally injected anesthetic to numb the area around the tooth.
After the area is numb, Dr. Welnak uses a small tool called an elevator to gently rock the tooth and enlarge the size of the socket. This process also detaches the tooth from the periodontal ligament which anchors it to the jaw bone. When the socket is sufficiently large, the doctor grasps the tooth with a dental forceps and pulls it out.

Following extraction, the dentist cleans the area and sutures the gums closed. The patient must bite on a sterile gauze pad for 15 to 20 minutes to quell the bleeding and begin the formation of a clot.

At-home care

Dr. Welnak advises a simple self-care routine for recovery from extraction. It includes:

  • Rinsing with salt water for a day or two
  • Antibiotics if prescribed
  • A soft diet for two to three days
  • No smoking or drinking with a straw for two to three days
  • Returning to the office for suture removal as required

It's important to avoid using a straw or smoking because the suction can dislodge the blood clot which forms in the socket. Without a clot, a painful dry socket develops. This infection deteriorates the jaw bone. Occurring in three to four percent of extractions, according to the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, a dry socket requires immediate care from your dentist who will flush the area with antiseptic medication and apply a healing paste. Oral antibiotics may be needed as well.

Don't be overly concerned

You'll receive the best of care at Root River Dental. If you have a troublesome tooth, please call Dr. Jeffrey Welnak for an appointment. Phone (414) 545-2050.

By Root River Dental
August 28, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   Veneers  
VivicasVeneerstheMakingofaHollywoodSmile

What's an actor's most important feature? According to Vivica A. Fox, whose most recent big-screen role was in Independence Day: Resurgence, it's what you see right up front.

"On screen, your smile and your eyes are the most inviting things that bring the audience in" she said. "Especially if you play the hot chick."

But like lots of people, Vivica reached a point where she felt her smile needed a little help in order to look its best. That's when she turned to a popular cosmetic dental treatment.

"I got veneers years ago," Ms. Fox told Dear Doctor magazine in a recent interview, "just because I had some gapping that probably only I noticed."

What exactly are dental veneers? Essentially, they are thin shells of lustrous porcelain that are permanently attached to the front surfaces of the teeth. Tough, lifelike and stain-resistant, they can cover up a number of defects in your smile — including stains, chips, cracks, and even minor spacing irregularities like the ones Vivica had.

Veneers have become the treatment of choice for Hollywood celebs — and lots of regular folks too — for many reasons. Unlike some treatments that can take many months, it takes just a few appointments to have veneers placed on your teeth. Because they are custom made just for you, they allow you to decide how bright you want your smile to be: anywhere from a natural pearly hue to a brilliant "Hollywood white." Best of all, they are easy to maintain, and can last for many years with only routine care.

To place traditional veneers, it's necessary to prepare the tooth by removing a small amount (a millimeter or two) of its enamel surface. This keeps it from feeling too big — but it also means the treatment can't be reversed, so once you get veneers, you'll always have them. In certain situations, "no-prep" or minimal-prep veneers, which require little or no removal of tooth enamel, may be an option for some people.

Veneers aren't the only way to create a better smile: Teeth whitening, crowns or orthodontic work may also be an alternative. But for many, veneers are the preferred option. What does Vivica think of hers?

"I love my veneers!" she declared, noting that they have held up well for over a decade.

For more information about veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.





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